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Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
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  • Product not yet rated Contains 11 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 11/02/2022 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    This train-the-trainer workshop for healthcare providers, clinicians and health educators offers a comprehensive systems approach to improve quality of care, evaluate success and quality improvement strategies. Participants gain the skills to implement the SCRIPT® program with other colleagues and peers, and conduct routine assessment and evaluation in this four-hour workshop.

    This four-hour workshop is designed to train health professionals to promote, implement, and evaluate the Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT®) Program, an award-winning, evidence-based program designed to help pregnant women quit smoking.

    The training is designed to provide insight and skills on how the program can become part of routine prenatal care.

    Mirine Richey

    MPH, IBCLC

    Florida State University, Faculty

    Mirine received her Master’s in Public Health with field work in epidemiology from Florida International University. She is an International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant, and currently in a research faculty position with Florida State University. Ms. Richey’s 20-year career includes work in hospitals and public health programs and her training experience includes leading the statewide implementation of SCRIPT® for Florida home visiting programs and has been a SCRIPT® trainer since 2014.

    Pamela Graef Luckett

    MCC, LPC, CTTS

    PGL Consulting LLC

    After over 20 years working in tobacco control and cessation, I understand the special needs of pregnant smokers and have been instrumental in developing protocols for cessation services specific to this population.  I have worked with the SCRIPT® program and behavioral health organizations, in the state of Mississippi, to help reduce tobacco use among pregnant smokers for 8 years and was in the first Train the Trainer workshop offered through SOPHE in 2012.  I have worked to help pregnant smokers quit and realize how hard it can be to get past an addiction and deal with pregnancy at the same time.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 10 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 11/01/2022 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    This four-hour counselor workshop trains healthcare providers, clinicians and health educators to integrate a SCRIPT® intervention session into their prenatal care and follow up care protocols. Participants gain the skills to use the SCRIPT® program as a routine part of their client's prenatal care – from screening to counseling to follow up.

    SOPHE's Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT®) Program offers a live virtual counselor training! This four-hour workshop trains health professionals to integrate and promote SCRIPT® in a healthcare system or client intake environment. 

    Participants gain insight and the needed skills to use the program as part of their routine prenatal care screening process.

    Note: All registrants should participate on an individual computer to facilitate breakout room interaction and role-play exercises.

    Pamela Graef Luckett

    MCC, LPC, CTTS

    PGL Consulting LLC

    After over 20 years working in tobacco control and cessation, I understand the special needs of pregnant smokers and have been instrumental in developing protocols for cessation services specific to this population.  I have worked with the SCRIPT® program and behavioral health organizations, in the state of Mississippi, to help reduce tobacco use among pregnant smokers for 8 years and was in the first Train the Trainer workshop offered through SOPHE in 2012.  I have worked to help pregnant smokers quit and realize how hard it can be to get past an addiction and deal with pregnancy at the same time.

    Sally Wagoner

    RN, Certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist

    Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial Hospital, Community Health & Wellness Department (Fremont, Michigan)

    Sally Wagoner, RN,BSN,  is a certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist. Until recent retirement, she was employed by Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial Hospital, Community Health & Wellness Department (Fremont, Michigan) where she provided SCRIPT counseling. She developed the tobacco cessation treatment and referral protocol for the OB Clinic, Triage and In Patient Units at Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial Hospital. 


  • Product not yet rated Contains 2 Product(s)

    This bundle includes the SCRIPT Counselor Training Modules 1 & 2 on Tuesday, November 1 and Adopting SCRIPT in your Organization Training Workshop Modules 3 & 4 offered on Wednesday, November 2. Receive a 15% discount by purchasing the bundle of both live trainings!

    SOPHE’s evidence-based SCRIPT® Counselor Training enables you to integrate the SCRIPT® program into your routine prenatal care screening process. Upon completion of this half-day training, you can:

    • Demonstrate the latest motivational interviewing techniques with pregnant women.
    • Describe at least two strategies for baseline and follow-up smoking assessment in pregnant smokers.
    • Integrate the SCRIPT program principles in your prenatal setting.

    SOPHE's Adopting SCRIPT in your Organization Training Workshop is a half-day workshop to train health professionals to promote, implement, and evaluate the Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT® ) Program. ,SCRIPT® is an award-winning, evidence-based program designed to help pregnant women quit smoking. The training provides skills and the insight on how the program can become part of routine prenatal care.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 09/15/2022 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    This live webinar will be presented by the SOPHE Professional Preparation Committee in response to questions raised around the Student Health Edu-Thon, and to encourage participation in the 2023 Student Health Edu-Thon.

    During SOPHE’s Annual Conference, Student Health Edu-Thon Teams present an evidence-based scenario response that demonstrates their health education specialist competencies, uses of technology, and emerging methodologies. This live webinar will introduce the SOPHE Student Health Edu-Thon experience to perspective students teams and faculty mentors (8.3.1) By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to identify 3 benefits of participating in the Student Health Edu-thon

    Jordan Miller, MPH, MCHES

    Senior Lecturer and Program Director, Population Health, MS

    Arizona State University

    Jordan Miller is a Doctor of Public Health and Master Certified Health Education Specialist. She serves on the SOPHE Professional Preparation and Student Health Edu-Thon Committees. She is a Senior Lecturer and Program Director for the Population Health, MS at Arizona State University. Her research and practice interests include experiential learning, mentoring, diabetes, and the health impacts of greenspace. 

    email: Jordan.Anne.Miller@asu.edu

    https://twitter.com/DrJordanMiller  @DrJordanMiller   

    Dr. Susan A. Milstein, PhD, MA, MCHES®

    Lead Consultant

    Milstein Health Consulting

    Dr. Susan Milstein is Master Certified Health Education Specialist. She has a PhD in Human Sexuality Education and serves on the SOPHE Professional Preparation and Student Health Edu-Thon Committees. She is the Lead Consultant for Milstein Health Consulting, and an author/editor of several textbooks. 

    email: drsuemilstein@gmail.com

    https://twitter.com/DrSueMilstein @DrSueMilstein        

    Chelsey Hughes, MS, CHES® (Moderator)

    Project Manager, Grants

    Society for Public Health Education

    Chelsey Hughes, MS, CHES® is the Project Manager, Grants at the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE). She holds a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science from Old Dominion University and a Master of Science in Health Promotion from Maryland University of Integrative Health. She brings several years of experience in school health, health education, and health promotion as she has authored and co-authored health education and promotion programs focused on health, wellness, and nutrition for school-aged children, adolescents, and adults. Hughes oversees the CDC Healthy Schools cooperative agreements as well as several internal committees at SOPHE; SOPHE Awards, Professional Preparation Committee, and the Student Health Edu-Thon Subcommittee.

    • Register
      • Early bird pricing available!
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Member - Free!
      • Student Member - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • Regular Price after 09/15/2022 4:00 PM
      • Non-member - $18
      • Member - $9
      • Student Member - $5
      • Student Non-Member - $10
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  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Publication Date: June 13, 2022; This article provides an examination of the relationship of levels of physical activity between children with multimorbidity and those with a chronic physical illness only.

    This study measured physical activity (PA) and explored its correlates among children with multimorbidity (co-occurring chronic physical and mental illness; MM) versus those with chronic physical illness only (PI). This study used baseline data from the Multimorbidity in Children and Youth Across the Life Course (MY LIFE) study, an on-going cohort study following 263 children with a PI 2 to 16 years of age (mean age: 9.8 years, SD = 4.0; 47.7% female). PA was measured using accelerometry, and demographic and psychosocial variables were collected using questionnaires. Of the 55 children with MM and the 85 with PI with valid accelerometer data, 38.1% and 41.2%, respectively, met average daily PA guidelines. Correlates of moderate-to-physical PA (MVPA) among children with MM were age, ρ(53) = −0.45, p = .001, body mass index (BMI), ρ(48) = −0.28, p = .04, self-perceived behavioral conduct, ρ(24) = −0.45, p = .02, physical health-related quality of life, ρ(51) = 0.56, p < .001, and peer support, ρ(52) = 0.27, p = .04. Correlates of MVPA among children with PI were age, ρ(83) = −0.40, p < .001, sex, ρ(83) = −0.26, p = .01, self-perceived social competence, ρ(31) = 0.42, p = .02, self-perceived athletic competence, ρ(31) = 0.48, p = .005, physical health-related quality of life, ρ(83) = 0.34, p = .001, participation in community sport, ρ(31) = 0.41, p = .02, and family functioning, ρ(83) = 0.26, p = .02. These results demonstrate that children with PI and MM are insufficiently active and their PA is correlated with demographic and psychosocial factors.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Publication Date: March 7, 2022; This article provides an examination of whether an intervention is effective in increasing pregnant women's appraisals of the severity and likelihood of flu and their intention to have the flu vaccination while pregnant.

    Pregnant women are at increased risk of complications from flu, but uptake of flu vaccination is below 75% targets. Evidence suggests that changing illness risk appraisals may increase vaccination behaviour. In 2018–2019, researchers, public health specialists, and pregnant women co-designed a short animation targeting (unhelpful) beliefs underlying pregnant women’s flu risk appraisals aiming to promote vaccination uptake. This study aimed to examine effectiveness of a digital intervention (animation) in increasing flu vaccination among pregnant women through changing illness risk appraisals. A prospective study design was used, involving convenience sampling of unvaccinated pregnant women recruited via a Qualtrics Online Panel. Participants received small payments via the panel for survey completion. Risk appraisals and intention to vaccinate were measured at baseline and immediately after intervention presentation (follow-up one). Six months later, a further survey (follow-up two) was administered measuring vaccination behaviour. Baseline and first follow-up surveys were completed by 411 participants. Watching the animation led to increased appraisals of likelihood of getting flu while pregnant and severity of flu during pregnancy, and increased intentions to accept flu vaccination during pregnancy. Of the 67 respondents who completed follow-up survey two, 38 reported having the vaccination while pregnant. This study provides evidence supporting the promise of the intervention. Randomized controlled trials are required to produce definitive efficacy evidence. Should such a study prove intervention effectiveness, it could be readily embedded within existing campaigns at national and local levels by public health organizations.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Publication Date: April 7, 2022; This article provides an example of how one smoking cessation campaign targeted the LGBTQ community of Western North Kentucky, also offering considerations for practitioners who implement similar campaigns of their own.

    Despite well-documented inequities in tobacco use for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations, there is little practical guidance for local public health officials on developing and implementing media campaigns that prioritize lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) communities. In this practice note article, we describe the development and lessons learned from a location-based media campaign to promote tobacco use cessation and raise awareness of QuitlineNC among lesbian and bisexual women in Western North Carolina. The campaign used a digital approach based on cell phone locations and marketing profiles to deliver messages across 4 years (2018–2021). Considerations for practitioners include how our project required messaging adaptation to meet Google’s restrictions against using the word “yours” and the importance of addressing privacy protection concerns with state officials to enable collection of outcome evaluation measures via a conversion pixel (code for capturing metrics).

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Publication Date: December 30, 2021; This article provides an explanation as to how a set of research data informed an opera on Veteran recovery.

    There is an emerging literature on research interviews to inform arts projects, but little on opera. This case study illustrates how research data informed an opera on Veteran recovery. Deidentified interviews were selected from 280 adults with a history of depression at 10-year follow-up to a randomized trial. Interviews were used to inform characters, storyline, and libretto. Ethical strategies included: changing details and merging stories and characters to create two Veterans and one spouse as leads, a storyline, and choral passages, with a focus on recovery from post-traumatic stress and homelessness. To engage a broad audience and address stigma, accessible composition techniques (melody, harmony) were used. We found that qualitative/mixed data can inform libretto and composition for an opera on Veteran recovery, through integrating art and health science.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Publication Date: December 6, 2022. This article discusses the CDC Undergraduate Public Health Scholars (CUPS) program which is used to expose students who are underrepresented in public health and medicine. A survey was sent out to 1,047 students to complete and follow their journey to higher academia.

    Established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the goal of the CDC Undergraduate Public Health Scholars (CUPS) program is to expose students underrepresented in public health and medicine to careers in public health; ultimately, increasing the membership of these groups in these fields including biomedical sciences. CDC implemented a retrospective outcome evaluation of 1,047 students who participated in the program from 2012 to 2017. Seventy-four percent (775) of students responded to the survey that captures their academic attainment and employment status, as well as their perception of the program’s and mentors’ influence on their career path. As of 2020, 639 (83.4%) of 775 participants have enrolled in an advanced degree program, with over 80% of 639 participants pursuing degrees in biomedical sciences, public health, or health care (BSPHHC)–related fields. Two thirds (374/566) of participants who reported they had ever been employed in a career position are working/have worked in BSPHHC-related fields. Overall, 77.4% (600) of 775 participants reported either the program or the mentors, or both were extremely or very influential to their career path. Students claimed the CUPS program had “opened their eyes,” inspired their interest, cultivated their passion for the field of public health, and fueled their drive to find solutions to and in social determinants of health and contribute to health equity. The opportunity to gain work and research experience through internship placements in CUPS has “opened doors” to first jobs and advanced education and training opportunities for many students.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Publication date: April 26, 2021. This article discusses a community-engaged classroom project at a minority- and indigenous-serving undergraduate institution, focusing on indigenous student empowerment. Students designed, implemented, and evaluated a tobacco product education campaign to effect change using a community-engaged approach among the campus.

    Community-engaged classrooms offer advantages to both students and community-based organizations by creating an environment where students become agents of change and contribute to meeting communities’ health needs. However, most community-engaged classroom research is done in high-income contexts in advanced curriculums with graduate students. This article explores a community-engaged classroom project at a minority- and indigenous-serving undergraduate institution, focusing on indigenous student empowerment. Commercial tobacco use prevention is of particular importance to indigenous contexts and resulted in a college policy change to reflect indigenous values. Students designed, implemented, and evaluated a tobacco product education campaign to effect change using a community-engaged approach. The educational activities included (1) understanding the tobacco context, (2) health communication course design, (3) forming key partnerships, (4) facilitating student activities through behind-the-scenes work, (5) designing and implementing a campaign, and (6) student growth and empowerment. We illustrate how academic and state partnerships can align interests in implementing public health policies and providing students with real-world public health communication and health equity experience.