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Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
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  • Product not yet rated Contains 11 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 11/02/2022 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    This half-day workshop is designed to train health professionals to promote, implement, and evaluate the Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT®) Program, an award-winning, evidence-based program designed to help pregnant women quit smoking. The training is designed to provide insight and skills on how the program can become part of routine prenatal care.

    This half-day workshop is designed to train health professionals to promote, implement, and evaluate the Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT®) Program, an award-winning, evidence-based program designed to help pregnant women quit smoking.

    The training is designed to provide insight and skills on how the program can become part of routine prenatal care.

    Mirine Richey

    MPH, IBCLC

    Florida State University, Faculty

    Mirine received her Master’s in Public Health with field work in epidemiology from Florida International University. She is an International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant, and currently in a research faculty position with Florida State University. Ms. Richey’s 20-year career includes work in hospitals and public health programs and her training experience includes leading the statewide implementation of SCRIPT® for Florida home visiting programs and has been a SCRIPT® trainer since 2014.

    Pamela Graef Luckett

    MCC, LPC, CTTS

    PGL Consulting LLC

    After over 20 years working in tobacco control and cessation, I understand the special needs of pregnant smokers and have been instrumental in developing protocols for cessation services specific to this population.  I have worked with the SCRIPT® program and behavioral health organizations, in the state of Mississippi, to help reduce tobacco use among pregnant smokers for 8 years and was in the first Train the Trainer workshop offered through SOPHE in 2012.  I have worked to help pregnant smokers quit and realize how hard it can be to get past an addiction and deal with pregnancy at the same time.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 10 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 11/01/2022 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    This half-day workshop trains healthcare providers, clinicians and health educators to integrate and promote SCRIPT® into their prenatal care and follow up care protocols. Participants gain the skills to use the program as a routine part of their client's prenatal care screening process.

    SOPHE's Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT®) Program offers a live virtual counselor training! This half-day workshop trains health professionals to integrate and promote SCRIPT® in a healthcare system or client intake environment. 

    Participants gain insight and the needed skills to use the program as part of their routine prenatal care screening process.

    Note: All registrants should participate on an individual computer to facilitate breakout room interaction and role-play exercises.

    Pamela Graef Luckett

    MCC, LPC, CTTS

    PGL Consulting LLC

    After over 20 years working in tobacco control and cessation, I understand the special needs of pregnant smokers and have been instrumental in developing protocols for cessation services specific to this population.  I have worked with the SCRIPT® program and behavioral health organizations, in the state of Mississippi, to help reduce tobacco use among pregnant smokers for 8 years and was in the first Train the Trainer workshop offered through SOPHE in 2012.  I have worked to help pregnant smokers quit and realize how hard it can be to get past an addiction and deal with pregnancy at the same time.

    Sally Wagoner

    RN, Certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist

    Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial Hospital, Community Health & Wellness Department (Fremont, Michigan)

    Sally Wagoner, RN,BSN,  is a certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist. Until recent retirement, she was employed by Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial Hospital, Community Health & Wellness Department (Fremont, Michigan) where she provided SCRIPT counseling. She developed the tobacco cessation treatment and referral protocol for the OB Clinic, Triage and In Patient Units at Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial Hospital. 


  • Product not yet rated Contains 2 Product(s)

    This bundle includes the SCRIPT Counselor Training Modules 1 & 2 on Tuesday, November 1 and Adopting SCRIPT in your Organization Training Workshop Modules 3 & 4 offered on Wednesday, November 2. Receive a 15% discount by purchasing the bundle of both live trainings!

    SOPHE’s evidence-based SCRIPT® Counselor Training enables you to integrate the SCRIPT® program into your routine prenatal care screening process. Upon completion of this half-day training, you can:

    • Demonstrate the latest motivational interviewing techniques with pregnant women.
    • Describe at least two strategies for baseline and follow-up smoking assessment in pregnant smokers.
    • Integrate the SCRIPT program principles in your prenatal setting.

    SOPHE's Adopting SCRIPT in your Organization Training Workshop is a half-day workshop to train health professionals to promote, implement, and evaluate the Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT® ) Program. ,SCRIPT® is an award-winning, evidence-based program designed to help pregnant women quit smoking. The training provides skills and the insight on how the program can become part of routine prenatal care.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Publication Date: December 6, 2022. This article discusses the CDC Undergraduate Public Health Scholars (CUPS) program which is used to expose students who are underrepresented in public health and medicine. A survey was sent out to 1,047 students to complete and follow their journey to higher academia.

    Established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the goal of the CDC Undergraduate Public Health Scholars (CUPS) program is to expose students underrepresented in public health and medicine to careers in public health; ultimately, increasing the membership of these groups in these fields including biomedical sciences. CDC implemented a retrospective outcome evaluation of 1,047 students who participated in the program from 2012 to 2017. Seventy-four percent (775) of students responded to the survey that captures their academic attainment and employment status, as well as their perception of the program’s and mentors’ influence on their career path. As of 2020, 639 (83.4%) of 775 participants have enrolled in an advanced degree program, with over 80% of 639 participants pursuing degrees in biomedical sciences, public health, or health care (BSPHHC)–related fields. Two thirds (374/566) of participants who reported they had ever been employed in a career position are working/have worked in BSPHHC-related fields. Overall, 77.4% (600) of 775 participants reported either the program or the mentors, or both were extremely or very influential to their career path. Students claimed the CUPS program had “opened their eyes,” inspired their interest, cultivated their passion for the field of public health, and fueled their drive to find solutions to and in social determinants of health and contribute to health equity. The opportunity to gain work and research experience through internship placements in CUPS has “opened doors” to first jobs and advanced education and training opportunities for many students.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Publication date: April 26, 2021. This article discusses a community-engaged classroom project at a minority- and indigenous-serving undergraduate institution, focusing on indigenous student empowerment. Students designed, implemented, and evaluated a tobacco product education campaign to effect change using a community-engaged approach among the campus.

    Community-engaged classrooms offer advantages to both students and community-based organizations by creating an environment where students become agents of change and contribute to meeting communities’ health needs. However, most community-engaged classroom research is done in high-income contexts in advanced curriculums with graduate students. This article explores a community-engaged classroom project at a minority- and indigenous-serving undergraduate institution, focusing on indigenous student empowerment. Commercial tobacco use prevention is of particular importance to indigenous contexts and resulted in a college policy change to reflect indigenous values. Students designed, implemented, and evaluated a tobacco product education campaign to effect change using a community-engaged approach. The educational activities included (1) understanding the tobacco context, (2) health communication course design, (3) forming key partnerships, (4) facilitating student activities through behind-the-scenes work, (5) designing and implementing a campaign, and (6) student growth and empowerment. We illustrate how academic and state partnerships can align interests in implementing public health policies and providing students with real-world public health communication and health equity experience.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Publication Date: December 14, 2021. This article discusses what implicit bias is and and how it can be avoided in public health professional settings. The article is used to explain bias as conducted in an Introduction to Public Health course. The article discusses how this activity can be adapted and guidance on how to make this activity work for any course.

    Implicit bias is a topic many faculty/instructors may feel uncomfortable teaching and discussing with their students. As public health professionals, it is important that we teach the next generation of public health professionals about bias so that they are able to address the elements in society that allow these biases to affect the health care that is received and the health outcomes that occur because of these biases. This article provides detailed information on an activity around bias conducted with undergraduate students in an Introduction to Public Health course. The article discusses how this activity can be adapted and guidance on how to make this activity work for any course.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Publication Date: December 6, 2021. This article discusses the 10 -week internship program at Summer Public Health Scholars Program (SPHSP) at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC). The program is aimed to pipeline underrepresented students into public health graduate programs and careers by providing mentorship, academic enrichment, professional development, and field-based placements.

    A public health workforce that reflects the increasing diversity of the U.S. population is critical for health promotion and to eliminate persistent health disparities. Academic institutions must provide appropriate education and training to increase diversity in public health professions to improve efforts to provide culturally competent care and programs in the most vulnerable communities. Reaching into the existing talent pool of diverse candidates at the undergraduate level is a promising avenue for building a pipeline to advanced training and professional careers in the field of public health. The Summer Public Health Scholars Program (SPHSP) at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) is a 10-week summer internship program with a mission to increase knowledge and interest in public health and biomedical sciences. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Undergraduate Public Health Summer Programs, sponsored by the CDC’s Office of Minority Health and Health Equity, SPHSP aims to pipeline underrepresented students into public health graduate programs and careers by providing mentorship, academic enrichment, professional development, and field-based placements. The SPHSP is uniquely positioned to offer scholars a program that exposes them to core public health training components through the joint effort of all four CUIMC schools: public health, dentistry, nursing, and medicine. Here, we describe the program’s academic enrichment components, which provide advanced and multifaceted public health training opportunities. We discuss the impacts of the program on student outcomes and lessons learned in developing and refining the program model.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/19/2022

    In this webinar, viewers will learn why research is important for undergraduate health education majors and identify promotion strategies to get more undergraduate health education majors involved in research.

    By the end of the session, the participants will be able to describe two reasons why research is important for undergraduate health education majors. 4.2.4

    By the end of the session, the participants will be able to identify two promotion strategies to get more undergraduate health education majors involved in research. 4.2.4

    Erin Sweeney, PhD, MEd, MCHES

    Assistant Professor

    University of Nebraska Kearney

    Erin Sweeney, PhD, MEd, MCHES has been in the health education field for over 15 years. Dr. Sweeney taught at the middle school level before transitioning to academia, where she has been for the past ten years. She currently teaches health education courses at the University of Nebraska Kearney, teaching both to the general college population and health/PE teacher candidates. Dr. Sweeney has presented at multiple state and national conferences and published in multiple journals, with a focus on high school drug testing, pedagogy, adolescent health, sexuality education, and injury/violence prevention.

    Chelsey Hughes, MS, CHES®

    Project Manager, Grants

    Society for Public Health Education

    Chelsey Hughes, MS, CHES® is the Project Manager, Grants at the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE). She holds a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science from Old Dominion University and a Master of Science in Health Promotion from Maryland University of Integrative Health. She brings several years of experience in school health, health education, and health promotion as she has authored and co-authored health education and promotion programs focused on health, wellness, and nutrition for school-aged children, adolescents, and adults. Hughes oversees the CDC Healthy Schools cooperative agreements as well as several internal committees at SOPHE; SOPHE Awards, Professional Preparation Committee, and the Student Health Edu-Thon Subcommittee.

  • Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/21/2022

    FREE WEBINAR: SOPHE understands the ways in which recent local and state level policy actions have propagated dangerous misinformation against LGBTQ people and our LGBTQ youth are especially vulnerable. This webinar would be an opportunity to discuss tangible ways that inclusive LGBTQ health education curricula and approaches across the health education sector is both beneficial for positive health outcomes for LGBTQ people and how inclusive approaches to the LGBTQ health combats misinformation.

    Discuss tangible ways that inclusive LGBTQ health education curricula and approaches across the health education sector is both beneficial for positive health outcomes for LGBTQ people and how inclusive approaches to the LGBTQ health combats misinformation.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Identify three strategies to implement an inclusive LGBTQ youth curriculum and/or action plans 
    2. Discuss three potential outcomes of an inclusive LGBTQ youth curriculum and/or action plans and identify any potential barriers for sustainability of these curricula 
    3. Identify 3 ways that oppression disproportionately impacts LGBTQ youth of color

    Bishar Jenkins, Jr., MPP (Moderator)

    Manager, Policy and Programs

    Society for Public Health Education

    Bishar Jenkins, Jr., MPP is an emerging health equity practitioner based in Washington, D.C. Bishar earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and a Master of Public Policy degree from Brandeis University.  

    Bishar is the Manager of Policy and Programs at the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), where he leads their federal advocacy efforts. Prior to SOPHE, Bishar served as a Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Fellow. In this capacity, he served as a health policy staffer in the office of Congresswoman Frederica S. Wilson and completed his second rotation in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of HIV Prevention. Bishar actively centers health equity and justice in his health policy efforts.   

    Bishar proudly hails from Trenton, New Jersey.  

    Megan L. Smith, PhD

    Boise State University

    Dr. Smith’s work builds on education, human development, and public health science to study the contextual factors that promote or thwart health outcomes (particularly substance abuse, mental health, and sexual risk behavior) for young people. Previously a K-12 teacher, she often focuses on the school environment. While working for the WVU School of Public Health, she served as Director of Child & Adolescent Health initiatives for the Prevention Research Center. She is committed to public health advocacy and deeply believes it is the mission of public health professionals to continue to advocate for and champion equity and health for all.

    Preston Mitchum, JD, LLM

    Director of Advocacy and Government Affairs

    The Trevor Project

    Preston is a Black queer attorney, advocate, and activist with a focus on the power of Black people, young people, and queer, trans, and nonbinary people. With a decade of legal and policy experience, he is excited to be a part of The Trevor Project's lifesaving advocacy and government affairs team. Prior to Trevor, Preston served as the Director of Policy at URGE: Unite for Reproductive & Gender Equity. While there, he shaped state and federal strategies on reproductive health, rights, and justice in the South and Midwest, with issues on abortion access, comprehensive sexuality education,and LGBTQ+ health equities. He led reports on young people and voting and inclusive sexuality education for young people. Previously, he has worked at Advocates for Youth, the Center for Health and Gender Equity, Center for American Progress, and the National Coalition for LGBTQ Health. In addition, Preston has been an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center teaching LGBTQ Health Law & Policy and at American University Washington College of Law teaching Sexuality, Gender Identity, & the Law.

    Alex Keuroghlian, MD, MPH

    Director of Education and Training Programs

    The Fenway Institute

    Alex Keuroghlian MD MPH is Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and Director of the Division of Education and Training at The Fenway Institute. He directs the National LGBTQIA+ Health Education Center at The Fenway Institute, a HRSA BPHC-funded cooperative agreement to improve care for LGBTQIA+ people across the U.S., as well as the HRSA HAB-funded 2iS Coordinating Center for Technical Assistance. He established the Massachusetts General Hospital Psychiatry Gender Identity Program and is clerkship director for two senior electives in sexual and gender minority health at HMS, where he also co-directs the HMS Sexual and Gender Minority Health Equity Initiative, which leads longitudinal medical curriculum and faculty development in sexual and gender minority health.

    Mason J. Dunn, JD

    Deputy Director of Education and Training Programs

    Fenway Institute

    Mason J. Dunn, JD, is the Deputy Director of Education and Training Programs and the Fenway Institute. Mason is an lawyer, and brings their legal and advocacy experience to the Institute. They have worked in the LGBTQ+ equality movement for over 15 years across the country. Prior to joining Fenway, Mason was Executive Director of the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition where they successfully advocated for the advancement of nonbinary gender markers on Massachusetts state ID's, participated in coalition to address restrictions in healthcare and gender marker changes on Massachusetts birth certificates, and worked to build the coalition which passed state-wide nondiscrimination protections in public accommodations for transgender and nonbinary people. In 2018, Mason co-chaired the historic Yes on 3 campaign, which successfully defended the Massachusetts' trans-inclusive public accommodation nondiscrimination law, in the nation's first ever state-wide vote on transgender rights. 

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/13/2022

    Learn how an interdisciplinary team works to improve health outcomes and quality of life through the design of wearables - including clothing, wearable technology, protective equipment and rehabilitative or medical devices.

    Learn how an interdisciplinary team works to improve health outcomes and quality of life through the design of wearables - including clothing, wearable technology, protective equipment and rehabilitative or medical devices. 

    Dr. Martha Hall, director of the Innovation Health & Design Lab at University of Delaware shares her knowledge. These products address the broad spectrum of needs in various patient populations and highlight the importance of patient-centered design in health sciences.  The Lab’s projects include a variety of patient populations, including children with disabilities, patients recovering from stroke and professional athletes. 

    Learning objective:

    Participants will learn two (2) ways the University of Delaware’s Innovation Health & Design Lab works to improve health outcomes and quality of life through the design of wearable technology and garments (3.3.3)

    Martha L. Hall, PhD

    Director of Innovation for the College of Health Sciences

    Innovation Health & Design Lab, University of Delaware

    Martha L. Hall, PhD has served as director of Innovation for the College of Health Sciences at the University of Delaware since 2018. During her time as director she has developed the wearables for health research initiative based in the Innovation Health & Design Lab in the Tower at the STAR (Science, Technology, and Advanced Research) Campus.

    The Innovation Health & Design Lab at UD works to improve health outcomes and quality of life through the design of wearables - including clothing, wearable technology, protective equipment and rehabilitative or medical devices. These products are created to address the broad spectrum of needs in various patient populations and highlight the importance of patient-centered design in health sciences.  The Lab’s projects include a variety of patient populations, including children with disabilities, patients recovering from stroke and professional athletes. In every case, the needs of the target patient population frame the research and design process. With an interdisciplinary team of researchers from occupational therapy, medical diagnostics, kinesiology, behavioral health, mechanical engineering, electrical and computer engineering, prosthetics/orthotics design, and fashion, the Innovation Health & Design Lab provides a unique lens to innovate, prototype, and test new wearables for health. 

    Dr. Hall is a Delaware native and earned her bachelor's and master's degrees in Fashion Design from the University of Delaware and received her PhD in Biomechanics and Movement Science from the University of Delaware. Dr. Hall holds numerous patents in wearable technology and is an expert in user-centered functional design. Prior to coming to UD as the Director of Innovation, Dr. Hall worked in the apparel industry as a childrenswear designer and as a fashion design instructor.

    Zebley Diaz (Moderator)

    Editorial & Communications manager

    SOPHE

    Zebley Diaz currently serves as SOPHE's Editorial & Communications manager where she oversees management of Health Education and Behavior. Previously, she managed the Federal Bar Association's legal journal The Federal Lawyer. Zebley received her Masters in Strategic Communication from the University of Maryland Global Campus. She completed her bachelor's in journalism from the University of Hawaii in 2016.