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  • Product not yet rated Contains 11 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 11/02/2022 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    This half-day workshop is designed to train health professionals to promote, implement, and evaluate the Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT®) Program, an award-winning, evidence-based program designed to help pregnant women quit smoking. The training is designed to provide insight and skills on how the program can become part of routine prenatal care.

    This half-day workshop is designed to train health professionals to promote, implement, and evaluate the Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT®) Program, an award-winning, evidence-based program designed to help pregnant women quit smoking.

    The training is designed to provide insight and skills on how the program can become part of routine prenatal care.

    Mirine Richey

    MPH, IBCLC

    Florida State University, Faculty

    Mirine received her Master’s in Public Health with field work in epidemiology from Florida International University. She is an International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant, and currently in a research faculty position with Florida State University. Ms. Richey’s 20-year career includes work in hospitals and public health programs and her training experience includes leading the statewide implementation of SCRIPT® for Florida home visiting programs and has been a SCRIPT® trainer since 2014.

    Pamela Graef Luckett

    MCC, LPC, CTTS

    PGL Consulting LLC

    After over 20 years working in tobacco control and cessation, I understand the special needs of pregnant smokers and have been instrumental in developing protocols for cessation services specific to this population.  I have worked with the SCRIPT® program and behavioral health organizations, in the state of Mississippi, to help reduce tobacco use among pregnant smokers for 8 years and was in the first Train the Trainer workshop offered through SOPHE in 2012.  I have worked to help pregnant smokers quit and realize how hard it can be to get past an addiction and deal with pregnancy at the same time.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 10 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 11/01/2022 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    This half-day workshop trains healthcare providers, clinicians and health educators to integrate and promote SCRIPT® into their prenatal care and follow up care protocols. Participants gain the skills to use the program as a routine part of their client's prenatal care screening process.

    SOPHE's Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT®) Program offers a live virtual counselor training! This half-day workshop trains health professionals to integrate and promote SCRIPT® in a healthcare system or client intake environment. 

    Participants gain insight and the needed skills to use the program as part of their routine prenatal care screening process.

    Note: All registrants should participate on an individual computer to facilitate breakout room interaction and role-play exercises.

    Pamela Graef Luckett

    MCC, LPC, CTTS

    PGL Consulting LLC

    After over 20 years working in tobacco control and cessation, I understand the special needs of pregnant smokers and have been instrumental in developing protocols for cessation services specific to this population.  I have worked with the SCRIPT® program and behavioral health organizations, in the state of Mississippi, to help reduce tobacco use among pregnant smokers for 8 years and was in the first Train the Trainer workshop offered through SOPHE in 2012.  I have worked to help pregnant smokers quit and realize how hard it can be to get past an addiction and deal with pregnancy at the same time.

    Sally Wagoner

    RN, Certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist

    Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial Hospital, Community Health & Wellness Department (Fremont, Michigan)

    Sally Wagoner, RN,BSN,  is a certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist. Until recent retirement, she was employed by Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial Hospital, Community Health & Wellness Department (Fremont, Michigan) where she provided SCRIPT counseling. She developed the tobacco cessation treatment and referral protocol for the OB Clinic, Triage and In Patient Units at Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial Hospital. 


  • Product not yet rated Contains 2 Product(s)

    This bundle includes the SCRIPT Counselor Training Modules 1 & 2 on Tuesday, November 1 and Adopting SCRIPT in your Organization Training Workshop Modules 3 & 4 offered on Wednesday, November 2. Receive a 15% discount by purchasing the bundle of both live trainings!

    SOPHE’s evidence-based SCRIPT® Counselor Training enables you to integrate the SCRIPT® program into your routine prenatal care screening process. Upon completion of this half-day training, you can:

    • Demonstrate the latest motivational interviewing techniques with pregnant women.
    • Describe at least two strategies for baseline and follow-up smoking assessment in pregnant smokers.
    • Integrate the SCRIPT program principles in your prenatal setting.

    SOPHE's Adopting SCRIPT in your Organization Training Workshop is a half-day workshop to train health professionals to promote, implement, and evaluate the Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT® ) Program. ,SCRIPT® is an award-winning, evidence-based program designed to help pregnant women quit smoking. The training provides skills and the insight on how the program can become part of routine prenatal care.

  • Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/21/2022

    FREE WEBINAR: SOPHE understands the ways in which recent local and state level policy actions have propagated dangerous misinformation against LGBTQ people and our LGBTQ youth are especially vulnerable. This webinar would be an opportunity to discuss tangible ways that inclusive LGBTQ health education curricula and approaches across the health education sector is both beneficial for positive health outcomes for LGBTQ people and how inclusive approaches to the LGBTQ health combats misinformation.

    Discuss tangible ways that inclusive LGBTQ health education curricula and approaches across the health education sector is both beneficial for positive health outcomes for LGBTQ people and how inclusive approaches to the LGBTQ health combats misinformation.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Identify three strategies to implement an inclusive LGBTQ youth curriculum and/or action plans 
    2. Discuss three potential outcomes of an inclusive LGBTQ youth curriculum and/or action plans and identify any potential barriers for sustainability of these curricula 
    3. Identify 3 ways that oppression disproportionately impacts LGBTQ youth of color

    Bishar Jenkins, Jr., MPP (Moderator)

    Manager, Policy and Programs

    Society for Public Health Education

    Bishar Jenkins, Jr., MPP is an emerging health equity practitioner based in Washington, D.C. Bishar earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and a Master of Public Policy degree from Brandeis University.  

    Bishar is the Manager of Policy and Programs at the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), where he leads their federal advocacy efforts. Prior to SOPHE, Bishar served as a Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Fellow. In this capacity, he served as a health policy staffer in the office of Congresswoman Frederica S. Wilson and completed his second rotation in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of HIV Prevention. Bishar actively centers health equity and justice in his health policy efforts.   

    Bishar proudly hails from Trenton, New Jersey.  

    Megan L. Smith, PhD

    Boise State University

    Dr. Smith’s work builds on education, human development, and public health science to study the contextual factors that promote or thwart health outcomes (particularly substance abuse, mental health, and sexual risk behavior) for young people. Previously a K-12 teacher, she often focuses on the school environment. While working for the WVU School of Public Health, she served as Director of Child & Adolescent Health initiatives for the Prevention Research Center. She is committed to public health advocacy and deeply believes it is the mission of public health professionals to continue to advocate for and champion equity and health for all.

    Preston Mitchum, JD, LLM

    Director of Advocacy and Government Affairs

    The Trevor Project

    Preston is a Black queer attorney, advocate, and activist with a focus on the power of Black people, young people, and queer, trans, and nonbinary people. With a decade of legal and policy experience, he is excited to be a part of The Trevor Project's lifesaving advocacy and government affairs team. Prior to Trevor, Preston served as the Director of Policy at URGE: Unite for Reproductive & Gender Equity. While there, he shaped state and federal strategies on reproductive health, rights, and justice in the South and Midwest, with issues on abortion access, comprehensive sexuality education,and LGBTQ+ health equities. He led reports on young people and voting and inclusive sexuality education for young people. Previously, he has worked at Advocates for Youth, the Center for Health and Gender Equity, Center for American Progress, and the National Coalition for LGBTQ Health. In addition, Preston has been an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center teaching LGBTQ Health Law & Policy and at American University Washington College of Law teaching Sexuality, Gender Identity, & the Law.

    Alex Keuroghlian, MD, MPH

    Director of Education and Training Programs

    The Fenway Institute

    Alex Keuroghlian MD MPH is Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and Director of the Division of Education and Training at The Fenway Institute. He directs the National LGBTQIA+ Health Education Center at The Fenway Institute, a HRSA BPHC-funded cooperative agreement to improve care for LGBTQIA+ people across the U.S., as well as the HRSA HAB-funded 2iS Coordinating Center for Technical Assistance. He established the Massachusetts General Hospital Psychiatry Gender Identity Program and is clerkship director for two senior electives in sexual and gender minority health at HMS, where he also co-directs the HMS Sexual and Gender Minority Health Equity Initiative, which leads longitudinal medical curriculum and faculty development in sexual and gender minority health.

    Mason J. Dunn, JD

    Deputy Director of Education and Training Programs

    Fenway Institute

    Mason J. Dunn, JD, is the Deputy Director of Education and Training Programs and the Fenway Institute. Mason is an lawyer, and brings their legal and advocacy experience to the Institute. They have worked in the LGBTQ+ equality movement for over 15 years across the country. Prior to joining Fenway, Mason was Executive Director of the Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition where they successfully advocated for the advancement of nonbinary gender markers on Massachusetts state ID's, participated in coalition to address restrictions in healthcare and gender marker changes on Massachusetts birth certificates, and worked to build the coalition which passed state-wide nondiscrimination protections in public accommodations for transgender and nonbinary people. In 2018, Mason co-chaired the historic Yes on 3 campaign, which successfully defended the Massachusetts' trans-inclusive public accommodation nondiscrimination law, in the nation's first ever state-wide vote on transgender rights. 

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/13/2022

    Learn how an interdisciplinary team works to improve health outcomes and quality of life through the design of wearables - including clothing, wearable technology, protective equipment and rehabilitative or medical devices.

    Learn how an interdisciplinary team works to improve health outcomes and quality of life through the design of wearables - including clothing, wearable technology, protective equipment and rehabilitative or medical devices. 

    Dr. Martha Hall, director of the Innovation Health & Design Lab at University of Delaware shares her knowledge. These products address the broad spectrum of needs in various patient populations and highlight the importance of patient-centered design in health sciences.  The Lab’s projects include a variety of patient populations, including children with disabilities, patients recovering from stroke and professional athletes. 

    Learning objective:

    Participants will learn two (2) ways the University of Delaware’s Innovation Health & Design Lab works to improve health outcomes and quality of life through the design of wearable technology and garments (3.3.3)

    Martha L. Hall, PhD

    Director of Innovation for the College of Health Sciences

    Innovation Health & Design Lab, University of Delaware

    Martha L. Hall, PhD has served as director of Innovation for the College of Health Sciences at the University of Delaware since 2018. During her time as director she has developed the wearables for health research initiative based in the Innovation Health & Design Lab in the Tower at the STAR (Science, Technology, and Advanced Research) Campus.

    The Innovation Health & Design Lab at UD works to improve health outcomes and quality of life through the design of wearables - including clothing, wearable technology, protective equipment and rehabilitative or medical devices. These products are created to address the broad spectrum of needs in various patient populations and highlight the importance of patient-centered design in health sciences.  The Lab’s projects include a variety of patient populations, including children with disabilities, patients recovering from stroke and professional athletes. In every case, the needs of the target patient population frame the research and design process. With an interdisciplinary team of researchers from occupational therapy, medical diagnostics, kinesiology, behavioral health, mechanical engineering, electrical and computer engineering, prosthetics/orthotics design, and fashion, the Innovation Health & Design Lab provides a unique lens to innovate, prototype, and test new wearables for health. 

    Dr. Hall is a Delaware native and earned her bachelor's and master's degrees in Fashion Design from the University of Delaware and received her PhD in Biomechanics and Movement Science from the University of Delaware. Dr. Hall holds numerous patents in wearable technology and is an expert in user-centered functional design. Prior to coming to UD as the Director of Innovation, Dr. Hall worked in the apparel industry as a childrenswear designer and as a fashion design instructor.

    Zebley Diaz (Moderator)

    Editorial & Communications manager

    SOPHE

    Zebley Diaz currently serves as SOPHE's Editorial & Communications manager where she oversees management of Health Education and Behavior. Previously, she managed the Federal Bar Association's legal journal The Federal Lawyer. Zebley received her Masters in Strategic Communication from the University of Maryland Global Campus. She completed her bachelor's in journalism from the University of Hawaii in 2016.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this webinar, attendees will learn the history of Native health services, identify challenges of delivering remote evidence-based programs, and discuss best practices provided by a panel of programs in Native communities. This webinar will be in partnership with National Council of Aging (NCOA) who will share valuable resources from tribal workgroups.

    Please log in to your CORE eLearn account (free to register). To view this recording, add this webinar to your cart and enter the code "ARTHRITIS".

    In this webinar, attendees will learn the history of Native health services, identify challenges of delivering remote evidence-based programs, and discuss best practices provided by a panel of programs in Native communities. This webinar will be in partnership with National Council of Aging (NCOA) who will share valuable resources from tribal workgroups.

    Join to learn the history of Native health services, identify challenges of delivering remote evidence-based programs, and discuss best practices provided by a panel of programs in Native communities. This webinar will be in partnership with National Council of Aging (NCOA) who will share valuable resources from tribal workgroups.

    Webinar learning objectives:
    o Recognize 2 historical components of Native health services 
    o Discuss 3 challenges or barriers with starting and maintaining a remote evidence-based program in Native communities. 
    o Identify 3 culturally appropriate strategies to introduce a remote evidence-based program in a Native community 

    Deborah Stone-Walls

    Chief, Programs and Services

    USAging

    Deborah Stone-Walls joined the USAging team in September 2021 in the role of Chief, Programs and Services to oversee the wide spectrum of USAging initiatives. Prior to joining the staff of USAging Deborah served on the USAging Board of Directors from 2009 to 2018. In 2018 she was elected by her peers to serve as the Board President until her term ended in 2021. In her more than 30 years as a practitioner and administrator in the field of human services, Deborah served older adults, individuals of all ages with disabilities, and family caregivers with passion and a commitment to improving overall quality of life. From 2008 to 2021 she held the position of Executive on Aging for the Maui County Office on Aging/Aging and Disability Resource Center. During her 25 years living in Hawaii, Deborah embraced the multicultural richness of the islands that helped shape her commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion in both her personal and professional life.  

    Monte Yazzie, MA

    Injury Prevention Program Coordinator

    Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community

    Monte Yazzie, MA, is the Injury Prevention Program Coordinator for the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community. Monte is working to increase the health status and decrease unintentional injuries within the Community in Salt River. He is a Child Passenger Safety Instructor, Yoga and Tai Chi Instructor, and provides partnership and collaboration interventions as one of the leads for the Community Health and Wellness Summit Committee. Monte is working to build a program that promotes data driven, culturally appropriate interventions that strive for effectiveness and efficacy in an effort to provide immediate prevention measures that will benefit the present and future client needs.”

    Jennie R. Joe, PhD, MPH, MA

    Tribe: Dine’Nation (Navajo)

    Professor Emerita, Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

    Dr. Joe received her doctoral degree from UC Berkeley and San Francisco and joined the faculty at UCLA prior to coming to University of Arizona. Her academic background includes nursing, public health, anthropology, and medical anthropology. While at UA, she held an adjunct faculty position in American Indian Studies as well as serving as the director of the College of Medicine’s Native American Research and Training Center. Her research activity has and continues to focus on health disparities and its impact on native population, including health consequences due to chronic diseases, disabilities, cancer, etc. She has served on a number of state, national, and international committees, including the National Institute of Medicine and Canada’s Institute for Aboriginal Peoples’ Health Research.

    Kate R. Lorig, DrPH

    Self-Management Resource Center

    Self Management Resource Center, Professor Emerita at Stanford School of Medicine

    Kate served as the Director of the Stanford Patient Education Research Center and Professor of Medicine in the Stanford School of Medicine. She earned her bachelor’s degree in nursing at Boston University, and her master's and doctorate of public health in health education at the University of California, Berkeley. She came to Stanford in 1979 while a graduate student at Cal to develop and research an educational program that emphasized self-help skills for people with arthritis. This program became the Arthritis Self-Help Course and was the prototype for the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, The Diabetes Self-Management Program, the Positive Self-Management Program for HIV, the Cancer: Thriving and Surviving Program, the Building Better Caregiver's Program, the Chronic Pain Self-Management Program, and others. She has authored several books and many articles about arthritis, chronic disease in general, health education, and behavioral science. She travels extensively at the invitation of organizations concerned with patient care and academic research. She lives in Mountain View, CA, with her 2 cats and a collection of Native American art.

    R. Turner Goins, PhD

    Professor

    Western Carolina University, College of Health and Human Sciences

    R. Turner Goins is an endowed Professor at Western Carolina University in the College of Health and Human Sciences. She received her MS and PhD in gerontology from the University of Massachusetts-Boston and completed a National Institute of Aging’s post-doctoral research fellowship at Duke University’s Medical School. For the last 23 years, Dr. Goins’s research has focused on American Indian and Alaska Native aging- and health-related issues. Dr. Goins is a fellow at the Gerontological Society of America, past president of the Southern Gerontological Society, and in 2018 she was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Auckland in New Zealand where she spent time learning about aging-related issues among the Māori. 

    Amy Michael, M.S

    Arthritis Program Coordinator

    Minnesota Dept. of Health

    Amy Michael is the Minnesota Department of Health’s (MDH) Arthritis Program Coordinator. She has brought the Walk with Ease Program to Minnesota. She is a Master Trainer for the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, the Chronic Pain Self-Management Program and for the National Diabetes Prevention Program.  She has worked at MDH since 2012 sometime was spent working in the Diabetes Program and in the Statewide Self-Improvement Partnership (SHIP) program as a Health Systems Coordinator.  She has an M.S in Education and is married with 3 adult children.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/17/2022

    ​Attendees will be introduced to the CDC Undergraduate Public Health Scholars (CUPS) program in this webinar.

    Attendees will be introduced to the CDC Undergraduate Public Health Scholars (CUPS) program in this webinar. Attendees will get a behind-the-scenes look at the CUPS supplement and next steps for this pipeline program to achieve diversity in the public health workforce.  

    Kelly M. Bentley, PhD, MPH (Moderator)

    Associate Professor, Public Health

    The University of Maine at Farmington

    Dr. Kelly Bentley received a BED from Va Tech (1989) and her Master’s of Public Health in Maternal and Child Health (1996) and completed her Interdisciplinary Ph.D. at the University of New Brunswick. Kelly’s work has focused on women’s health, mothering, intimate partner violence (IPV), and health policy. She has over 24 years of experience in community health and has worked internationally, nationally, and at state and local levels. She is sought to speak about her research on mothers and IPV and is actively involved in violence prevention in the state and local community. Kelly has received numerous awards to include the prestigious Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Canada Graduate Scholarship Award. She has had over 25 grants funded by federal, state, and philanthropic organizations for community-level interventions, evaluation, and academic research.

    Leandris Liburd, PhD, MPH, MA

    Associate Director, Office of Minority Health and Health Equity

    CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION/AGENCY FOR TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND DISEASE REGISTRY (CDC/ATSDR)

    Since 2011, Dr. Liburd has served as the associate director for minority health and health equity for CDC/ATSDR. In this capacity, she leads and supports a wide range of critical functions in the agency’s work in minority health, health equity, and women’s health. She plays a critical leadership role in determining the agency’s vision for health equity, ensuring a rigorous and evidence-based approach to the practice of health equity, and promoting the ethical practice of public health in vulnerable communities. Dr. Liburd has been instrumental in building capacity across CDC and in public health agencies to address the social determinants of health, and in identifying and widely disseminating intervention strategies that reduce racial and ethnic health disparities. She has skillfully executed innovative models of collaboration that have greatly expanded the reach, influence, and impact of the Office of Minority Health and Health Equity (OMHHE) including the successful implementation of the CDC Undergraduate Public Health Scholars Program (CUPS) and the James A. Ferguson Emerging Infectious Diseases Graduate Fellowship. In May 2020, she assumed the role of Chief Health Equity Officer for CDC’s COVID-19 Response which was the first time in the agency’s history that this role and function was added to the leadership of the Incident Management Structure during the activation of CDC’s Emergency Operations Center. In 2021, she was tasked by the CDC director with co-leading the development of the agency’s first health equity science and intervention strategy known as CORE – an acronym for C-cultivate comprehensive health equity science, O-optimize interventions, R-reinforce and expand robust partnerships, and E-enhance capacity and workforce diversity and inclusion. This inaugural health equity strategy catalyzed commitments from all CDC centers, institutes, and offices resulting in over 150 health equity goals. When fully implemented, CDC’s CORE Commitment to Health Equity can transform how public health is practiced and accelerate achieving health equity. These and other accomplishments represent her tireless commitment to improve minority health and achieve health equity for all people. 

    Dr. Liburd has received honors for her leadership and management accomplishments. She was the 2021 recipient of the Harriet Hylton Barr Distinguished Alumni Award, one of the highest honors of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health. She always received the CDC Honor Award for Health Equity (Group Award) in recognition of her role as Chief Health Equity Officer and contributions of the entire unit in the COVID-19 Response. Among her other awards, Jackson State University presented her with the John Ruffin Award of Excellence in Minority Health and Health Disparities (2016), and the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions and BlackDoctor.org named her one of the Top Blacks in Healthcare in 2014 for her outstanding and noteworthy achievements in the healthcare field. In 2010, the National REACH Coalition honored her with their Distinguished Service and Leadership Award, and in 2002, CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation presented her with their Excellence in Collaboration Award for her seminal role in developing local, national, and international partnerships.

    Dr. Liburd holds a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, a master of public health in health education/health behavior from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a master of arts in cultural anthropology, and a doctor of philosophy degree in medical anthropology from Emory University.

    Roland J. Thorpe, Jr, PhD

    Co-Director DRPH Concentration in Health, Equity, and Social Justice Professor

    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    Roland J. Thorpe, Jr., Ph.D., MS, is a gerontologist and social epidemiologist with nationally-recognized expertise in minority aging, men’s health, and place-based disparities.

    Dr. Roland J. Thorpe, Jr. joined the Office of the Provost in 2017 as a Provost’s Fellow. His Fellowship project involved a collaboration with the Offices of Faculty Affairs and Research to design skills training modules for undergraduate research and develop a mentoring program to train graduate students, postdoctoral students, and faculty in the art and science of mentoring undergraduate students. In 2018, Dr. Thorpe was tapped to lead the Provost’s Postdoctoral Diversity Fellowship Program where he has emerged as a key thought leader equipped to address concerns and challenges associated with the diversification of the academic workforce. As the inaugural Associate Vice Provost of Faculty Diversity, he will dedicate more time to advancing key initiatives around faculty diversity.

    In his new role, Dr. Thorpe will work closely with Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs Andrew Douglas and Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer Katrina Caldwell to advance the Faculty Diversity Initiative (FDI). This includes providing infrastructure support for the Target of Opportunity Program and the Cluster Faculty Initiative, working with all diversity and inclusion deans and deans of faculty on campus to enhance support for faculty development and mentoring, and leading an expanded Provost Postdoctoral Diversity Fellowship Program.

    Dr. Thorpe is a Professor in the Department of Health, Behavior, and Society in the Bloomberg School of Public Health where he also serves as Deputy Director of the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Co-Director of the Johns Hopkins Alzheimer’s Disease Resource Center for Minority Aging Research, and Co-Director of the Health Equity and Social Justice Concentration of the DrPH Program. He holds joint appointments in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology and the Department of Neurology in the School of Medicine, and the Department of Sociology in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

    As a social epidemiologist and gerontologist, Dr. Thorpe's research focuses on how race, socioeconomic status, and segregation influence health and well-being for African Americans, particularly African American men. He is the recipient of numerous awards that recognize his commitment and valuable contributions to student and faculty mentoring, including the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Advising, Mentoring, and Teaching Recognition Award, the inaugural 2018 NHLBI OHD PRIDE Roland J. Thorpe, Jr. Mentoring Award, the 2020 JHBSPH Dean’s Award of Distinction in Faculty Mentoring, and the 2020 Minority Issues in Gerontology Outstanding Mentorship Award. Dr. Thorpe earned a bachelor’s in theoretical mathematics from Florida A&M University, a master’s in statistics, and a Ph.D. in clinical epidemiology with a graduate minor in gerontology from Purdue University.

    Kai H. Young, MPH, CHES®

    Senior Advisor, Strategy and Evaluation, OMHHE

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Ms. Kai H. Young is the Senior Advisor on Strategy and Evaluation in the Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She leads the evaluation of the CDC Undergraduate Public Health Scholars (CUPS) program and provides technical oversight of evaluation projects within the office.  

    Prior to joining the OMHHE, Ms. Young was a senior program evaluator and the project officer for the National Tuberculosis Indicators Project (NTIP) at the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination (DTBE), the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. In this role, she led the development and implementation of NTIP, the national performance monitoring system for TB programs in the United States. Her work included the standardization of the national TB indicators across TB programs in the U.S., the establishment of the national performance targets, and enabling the use of the national surveillance data for routine monitoring and management of TB cooperative agreement recipients and ensuring patients’ standard of care in the United States. Through her work with the national indicators, Ms. Young helped strengthen the national TB surveillance system and ensured its data quality for program management and decision making. In addition to her role as the division’s lead and advisor on the national indicators, she played a key role in developing the formula for allocating resources to state and local grantees and implementing performance-based funding.
    Ms. Young holds a Bachelor of Science degree in biochemistry with minors in health and social issues from the University of California at San Diego and a Master of Public Health in behavioral science and health education from the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University. 

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this webinar, presenters will engage in a dialogue to address these questions as well as offer examples of programs that successfully resolved some of these challenges in Native American, American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Communities.

    Please log in to your CORE eLearn account (free to register). To view this recording, add this webinar to your cart and enter the code "ARTHRITIS".

    In the recent report, “Successful Strategies & Lessons Learned from Implementing Evidence-Based Programs in American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Communities” professionals responsible for delivering evidence-based health promotion programs (referred as EBPs) for Elders emphasize the need to both understand the concept and importance of EBPs among program staff and program participants. The purpose of this webinar is to introduce Native American, American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Communities to Evidence-Based health promotion programs and illustrate best practices from these communities currently offering programs. In this webinar, presenters will engage in a dialogue to address these questions as well as offer examples of programs that successfully resolved some of these challenges in Native American, American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Communities.

    In this event, participants will be able to:
    1. Distinguish an EBP from one that is not evidence-based
    2. Identify at least three ways that their community can do the following:

    • benefit from EBPs
    • link with existing programs
    • adapt programs to fit within the community
    • identify possible challenges

    Learning Objectives

    1. Identify 2 existing Evidence-Based health promotion programs based programs that can be linked to serve their community (1.3.4 Assess existing and available resources, policies, programs, practices, and interventions)

    2. Identify 2 potential challenges in linking an Evidence-Based health promotion program to a Native American, American Indian, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian Community.

    Jennie R. Joe, PhD, MPH, MA (Moderator)

    Tribe: Dine’Nation (Navajo)

    Professor Emerita, Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

    Dr. Joe received her doctoral degree from UC Berkeley and San Francisco and joined the faculty at UCLA prior to coming to University of Arizona. Her academic background includes nursing, public health, anthropology, and medical anthropology. While at UA, she held an adjunct faculty position in American Indian Studies as well as serving as the director of the College of Medicine’s Native American Research and Training Center. Her research activity has and continues to focus on health disparities and its impact on native population, including health consequences due to chronic diseases, disabilities, cancer, etc. She has served on a number of state, national, and international committees, including the National Institute of Medicine and Canada’s Institute for Aboriginal Peoples’ Health Research.

    Becky Bendixen

    Tribal Program Specialist, Wisdom Warrior T-Trainer

    Northwest Regional Council

    Becky was born in the Territory of Alaska in King Cove, a fishing village of 700 people, located about 650 miles from anywhere. She lived in King Cove, happily subsisting on the plentiful Alaskan bounty over 40 years before moving to Washington State.

    Becky is one of the creators of the Wisdom Warrior program, which was founded in 2010 through her work as a Tribal Specialist.

    Working with the many tribal elders from many states across the nation has been a life’s dream and a great honor. Becky has increased her outreach to indigenous nations every year as Wisdom Warriors goes nationwide. Collaborating with tribes to implement Wisdom Warriors and share it throughout indigenous communities will always be one of her life’s greatest passions.

    The Wisdom Warrior program is changing elders’ lives on a daily basis and she feels blessed to be one of the program’s creators. Embracing our Indigenous ways is a priority for our people, as we heal and become stronger in ways that honor our sovereignty.   

    Roxanne Thomas, MSW, MSPPM

    (Dine’/Navajo & Numu/Paiute)

    Program Specialist II, Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc.

    Ms. Roxanne Thomas (Dine’/Navajo & Numu/Paiute), serves as a Program Specialist II with the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona – Area Agency on Aging, Region 8 (ITCA-AAA).  She coordinates the following programs: A Matter of Balance, EnhanceFitness, Title III Advocacy, and assists with the Arizona Indian Council on Aging (AICOA) Advisory Board.  

     Ms. Thomas holds a Master of Social Work (MSW) from Arizona State University and a Master of Science in Public Policy and Management from Carnegie Mellon University (MSPPM).  Prior to her employment with ITCA-AAA, she worked with the Indian Health Service (IHS) for six years providing an array of mental health services to children, adolescents, adults and families.  Ms. Thomas is passionate about improving the lifestyles and living conditions of urban and rural Native American populations.  She enjoys traveling, the company of her family and friends, and her role as a Mother to her wonderful son.

    Leslie Tanoue

    Director, Ke Ola Pono No Na Kupuna (Title VI) ALU LIKE, Inc. T-Trainer for CDSMP, DSMP, and CTS

    Alu Like Inc., Enhanced Fitness (Hawaii)

    Leslie Tanoue is Title VI Director at ALU LIKE, Inc.  She has been the Title VI director since 2019 and with ALU LIKE, Inc. since 1999.

    ALU LIKE, Inc. is a non-profit, Native Hawaiian serving organization whose mission is to assist Native Hawaiians who are committed to achieving their potential for themselves, their families, and communities.  We envision Hawaii, our special island home, as healthy, safe and productive, and guided by the shared values of all its people.

    Leslie is currently a T-Trainer for the following Self-Management Resource Center Programs:  Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, Diabetes Self-Management Program, and Cancer Thrive and Survive

  • Product not yet rated Contains 36 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/16/2021

    Have you wanted to lead more dynamic projects, engage more effectively with team members, optimize your and others’ strengths, and create change in your organization and community? UPLIFTS is a fast-paced, 10-hour intensive course that will prepare you to lead your own projects, build equitable and engaged teams, navigate conflict while creating opportunities for growth, and propel the fields of public health education, healthcare, and health administration to ignite forward-thinking systems that can withstand the next health crisis. Registration will close on Tuesday, November 2nd.

    Have you wanted to lead more dynamic projects, engage more effectively with team members, optimize your and others’ strengths, and create change in your organization and community?

    UPLIFTS is a fast-paced, 10-hour intensive course that will prepare you to lead your own projects, build equitable and engaged teams, navigate conflict while creating opportunities for growth, and propel the fields of public health education, healthcare, and health administration to ignite forward-thinking systems that can withstand the next health crisis. 

    During this 10-hour intensive hybrid course, you will learn the top TEN ways leaders in public health education UPLIFT their professional leadership goals at any level. You will learn how to:

    1. Maximize your personal strengths to lead yourself and others
    2. Implement adaptive leadership to transform teams and organizations
    3. Develop and communicate your leadership philosophy 
    4. Build a cohesive and functional team 
    5. Leverage your emotional intelligence to mediate common disputes
    6. Use conflict as a springboard for positive change
    7. Assess for change readiness and build momentum
    8. Use systems-thinking to convene partners
    9. Elevate collective impact through equity and justice
    10. Develop, implement, and assess your own leadership action plan

    Three synchronous sessions, October 12th, November 2nd, and 16th, and five asynchronous sessions are required for course completion.  Ten advanced-level continuing CECHs are being offered.  For questions, please email education@sophe.org.

    Course Kick-Off/Synchronous Session 1: October 12th, 12:00 – 1:00 pm Eastern
    Synchronous Session 2: November 2nd, 12:00 - 2:30 pm Eastern
    Synchronous Session 3: November 16th 12:00 - 2:30 pm Eastern

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    Module 1: Leader Within

    Description
    In this introductory module, leadership characteristics will be discussed.  Learners will gain an understanding of how personal growth and development can exemplify good character and how professional development and mentorship can help to hone skills in leading others.  A key focus will be on how learners can develop their own character and position themselves to showcase their own leadership skills. Topics of the following 5 modules will be introduced

    At the end of Module 1,
    1. Explore at least five personal leadership strengths.
    2. Identify up to three areas of leadership growth.
    3. Identify six pillars of leadership that support ethical decision-making in health education.
    4. Develop a leadership philosophy.

    Module 2: Transition to Team Leadership

    Description: 
    In this second module, leadership within a team is discussed.  Learners will gain insight into the skills required for being effective team members and facilitating teams.  The six pillars of the character covered in module 1 will be expanded upon to include how each characteristic applies to ethical decision-making and how to distribute equitable responsibility and power among team members. A reading assignment will provide depth to the topic and provide learners with practical application. Transitional challenges, team member equity, and problem-solving using ethical leadership will be shared and illustrated in a case study. An assessment of team leadership skills will help learners identify the next step in their personal leadership plan. 

    At the end of module 2, learners will;
    1. Identify at least five characteristics of effective teams.
    2. Describe how at least five cross-cutting skills can be applied to team leadership.
    3. Demonstrate at least three team leadership skills using a case study. 

    Module 3:  Leader-Oriented Approaches to Conflict

    Description
    The third module in the UPLIFT series will introduce a strategy for conflict management.  Leadership-oriented approaches to conflict management will be presented.  A case study will demonstrate how leaders bring disagreements into the open and address them. Using their own examples, learners will participate in the asynchronous discussions of how conflict can be transformative for the development of effective teams.  Tools for managing conflict in teams and organizations will be shared.  Additional competencies will be added to the learner’s personal leadership plan.

    At the end of module 3, learners will;
    1. Describe why conflict management is a leadership skill. 
    2. Identify tips to create greater emotional intelligence to react to conflict during times of change.
    3. Define at least four approaches to manage conflict among team members. 
    4. Demonstrate at least two conflict management strategies.

    Module 4: Change Leadership

    Description: 
    The fourth module focuses on change management. Learners identify key decision-makers and the people who influence them. Learners will practice persuasive communication, and implementing a healthy process for organizational change.  Managing risks and challenges associated with change, overcoming resistance, and building a positive change culture will be introduced in a case study. 

    At the end of module 4, learners will;
    1. Identify a change process in your organization.
    2. Identify a champion for the change.
    3. Develop a strategic change management plan for your organization.
    4. Demonstrate how persuasive communication can lessen resistance to change.

    Module 5: Systems-Level Change Agents

    Description: 
    In the final module, learners use logical systematic approaches to break down and solve problems. By leveraging expertise and contacts, the advanced leader incorporates innovative solutions into strategic decision-making that develops new partners and businesses. Learners will explore and have the opportunity to apply strategies to create trans-organizational systems based on common values and facilitate the integration of cultural sensitivity and competence.  Finally, learners discuss ways to empower others through the use of effective leadership traits; integrity, credibility, enthusiasm, commitment, honesty, and caring.

    At the end of module 5, learners will;
    1. Describe why systems thinking is a leadership skill.
    2. Use systems thinking to advocate for health equity. 
    3. Practice strategies for maintaining an environment that fosters a continuous commitment to improved leadership. 

    Kirsten Rodgers

    EdD, MSPH, MCHES®

    An Educational Consultant and Adjunct Faculty in Public Health for over 15 years who has conducted research and developed trainings in collaboration with National Networks of Public Health Institutes, de Beaumont Foundation, and Regional Public Health Training Centers to develop and improve leadership capacity in professional workforce in public health.  Currently contracts with the CDC to provide continuing education to employees in Leadership and other topics in Public Health.

    Davondra Brown, MEd, MCHES®

    Master Certified Health Education Specialist

    Davondra I. Brown Services, LLC

    Davondra Brown is a Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES®) who specializes in sexual wellness. She serves on the Board of Commissioners and the Division Board of Professional Development for the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, in addition to many other volunteer efforts. Mrs. Brown has earned a Bachelor’s in Philosophy, a Master’s in Education, and an advanced certificate of Innovative Technologies in Health Science Education.

    Michele Bildner

    MPH, MCHES®

    Michele is a second-year Doctor of Public Health Leadership student at the University of Illinois Chicago School of Public Health and has a dozen years’ experience in health education, with 9 years as an M/CHES. She has worked across industries in the health sector, and her organizational leadership experience ranges from the governmental sector, private industry (health insurance, healthcare), higher education, community, research and evaluation consulting, and non-profit philanthropy as an individual contributor, team member, and administrator. Michele has worked with the older adult population, youth, college students, and peer-to-peer as a mentor within organizations, often responsible for developing and implementing training for adult learners, leveraging the three academic years she has committed to as adjunct faculty in an undergraduate health education and promotion program. She has focused largely on non-infectious/chronic disease and obesity prevention at the policy, system, and environmental levels as well as issues of environmental justice (demolitions, lead poisoning, eviction prevention, food insecurity) with strategies that address racism across sectors in a health in all policies or whole government framework.

    Victoria Williams, PhD, MPH, MEd, MCHES®

    Behavioral Research Scientist and Instructional Designer

    State Farm & Walden University

    Victoria A. Williams, PhD, MPH, MEd, MCHES is a behavioral research scientist and instructional designer. She is a public health expert specializing in developing, implementing, and evaluating technology-based programs for diverse audiences. 

  • Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/16/2021

    This webinar showcases the roles and responsibilities of health education specialists in chronic disease self-management practices and the new Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) Recognizing Health Education Specialists Roles in Chronic Disease Prevention and Management: A Toolkit for Chronic Disease Self-Management Education emphasizing heart disease, diabetes, and obesity self-management practices.

    Healthy People 2030 focus is on preventing diabetes and heart disease complications by treatment management and disease-specific education. Thus, self-management practices are critical to managing both diabetes and heart diseases to delay serious complications and reduce associated risk factors. There is increasing evidence however that poor adherence to essential self-management behaviors is associated with a greater risk of negative health outcomes for adults. This webinar showcases the roles and responsibilities of health education specialists in chronic disease self-management practices and the new Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) Recognizing Health Education Specialists Roles in Chronic Disease Prevention and Management: A Toolkit for Chronic Disease Self-Management Education emphasizing heart disease, diabetes, and obesity self-management practices. 

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Describe at least two resources to advance health education specialist role in chronic diseases self-management and advocacy efforts in the field profession. (Area 5.2.5)
    2. Describe at least two strategies to expand the roles of health education specialists in chronic disease self-management practices. (Area 8.4.1)


    Alexis Williams, MPH, MS, MCHES®, NBM-HWC (Moderator)

    Lead, Health Education and Promotion Team

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Alexis Williams is Team Lead for the Health Education and Promotion Team in the Translation, Health Education, and Evaluation Branch of the Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She manages a team charged with developing, disseminating, and evaluating science-based and culturally-relevant health education and behavior change marketing resources, strategies, and interventions with a focus on underserved populations. Since joining DDT in 2009, she has developed health promotion tools and resources and provided training and technical assistance to help strengthen the capacity of DDT partners to deliver effective diabetes management and type 2 diabetes prevention programs, particularly in the areas of health promotion, marketing, and health equity. 

    Prior to joining CDC, Alexis spent 7 years managing the national dissemination of Body & Soul: A Celebration of Healthy Living and Eating for the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Body & Soul helped African American churches develop healthy eating programs for their congregations.  She was also a Public Health Advisor for the National 5 A Day for Better Health Campaign at NCI.  Before working with NCI, she was Manager of Nutrition and Physical Activity Promotion for the National Home Office of the American Cancer Society, where she helped develop and disseminate cancer prevention programs focused on healthy eating, increased physical activity, and obesity prevention.

    Alexis is a Master Certified Health Education Specialist and National Board of Medicine Certified Health and Wellness Coach. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from Mills College in Oakland, California, and a Master of Public Health in Behavioral Science and Health Education from Emory University in Atlanta. She also has a Master of Science in Instructional Design and Educational Technology from Walden University. A native of Chicago, IL, Alexis currently lives in the Atlanta area.

    Nicolette Powe, DrPH, MS, MCHES®

    Consultant

    Engagement for Health

    Dr. Nicolette Warren Powe is Assistant Professor of Public Health in the Department of Health Professions and the Department of Graduate Studies in Health & Rehabilitation Sciences at Youngstown State University. She received a DrPH in Health Education from the Loma Linda University, an MS in Health Promotion/Human Sciences from North Carolina Central University, and a BS in Community Health Education/Healthcare Ethics from Kent State University. Dr. Powe is a public health scientist whose primary interest is behavioral risk factors for chronic disease prevention. Dr. Powe’s research investigates racial/ethnic and sex differences in adherence to cardiometabolic self-management practices, specifically in young adults. Dr. Powe also studies applied health education theories to the implementation of health promotion programs and the dissemination of chronic disease program outcomes. 

    Dr. Powe’s work has resulted in the publication of the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) Minority National Organizations (MNO) Success Stories showcasing the health equity projects that worked towards closing the health disparity gap in at least one of the racial and ethnic minority groups. Dr. Powe serves on the Youngstown American Heart Association Board and the Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio Board. She is a member of The Links, Incorporated Youngstown Chapter. She was elected to the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) editorial board for Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning journal.
     

    Tricia Lenhart

    Student

    Youngstown University

    Tricia Lenhart has spent over 20 years in the health care industry. After graduating from Baldwin-Wallace University with a Bachelor of Science degree in biology she became an award-winning pharmaceutical sales representative for various dermatology and podiatry companies. Currently, she is a registered pharmacy technician in the state of Ohio for Rite Aid Corporation. She is pursuing her Master of Public Health degree through the Consortium of Eastern Ohio.

    Aditi Deshmukh, MSM, MPH

    Medical Student and Head of Project Management Team

    Northeast Ohio Medical University and BowTie Medical